French Courses - Summer

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The French Language Program offers teachers the opportunity to improve their skills, earn credit for professional development or continuing education, or qualify for a three-year MAT degree program. Teachers interested in joining the MAT program in French may apply after successful completion of two French courses in the World Languages Institute. The MAT program, which requires thirty credits of course work in French methodology, language, culture, or literature, is designed primarily for individuals already teaching French. These courses may be accepted for state certification. Details of the MAT program are available at the Department of French or its web site at http://french.rutgers.edu.

SUMMER 2018

Additional Course Offerings: See Core Curriculum


STUDIES IN CONTEMPORARY FRENCH CULTURE: ART, MUSEUM COLLECTIONS AND INTERCULTURAL DIALOGUE FOR THE FRENCH CLASSROOM (CR. 3.)
16:420:505:R1:03393
HYBRID; 7/9 - 7/20; M-F, 10:30 AM-3:30 PM; AB-3100
ON-CAMPUS DATES: 7/9, 7/10, 7/11, 7/12, 7/16, 7/17
ONLINE DATES: 7/13, 7/18, 7/19, 7/20
CHRISTELLE PALPACUER LEE
Using museum collections, the course examines selected movements, genres, themes, and artists that establish connections across languages and cultures. Through engagement with art, artistic practices, and museum collections, participants will reflect on the role of art as mediator in intercultural encounters, and art as a medium that both reflects and shapes languages and cultures. For instance, looking closely at the collections of the Zimmerli Art Museum in New Brunswick, we will discuss the Japonisme movement, and the influence of Japanese art on French and American visual arts since the mid-19th century. We will also focus on the genre of still lives, and its local and global evolution from the 17th century to today’s Instagrams. We will also discuss individual French and francophone artists who imagine otherness, and prompt a critical reflection on identity, interculturality, the power of representation, and the notion of cosmopolitan citizenship (e.g., Paul Gauguin, Michel Basquiat, street artist and photographer JR, etc.).  In this class, participants will: (1) learn about French art history as reflected by the collections of American museums in the tri-state area; (2) make intellectual, aesthetic, thematic, and intercultural connections across time, space, genres, media, and discourses; (3) engage in art-based practices for developing multiple literacies in the French language classroom; and (4) design an instructional sequence for their French classroom. In-class sessions will look closely at the collections of the Zimmerli Art Museum in New Brunswick and other museums in the NYC and Philadelphia areas, and model principles of foreign language learning and teaching using art and museum objects. Online sessions will include virtual visits of international and local museum collections, discussions, and activities that will lead to the development of an instructional module, ready to use in the French classroom in September. No prior knowledge of art history is required. Conducted in French.

TOPICS IN FRENCH LITERATURE FOR TEACHERS OF FRENCH: LET'S GO SHOPPING! REPRESENTATIONS OF CONSUMPTION IN FRANCE FROM THE FIRST DEPARTMENT STORE TO THE AGE OF GLOBALIZATION (CR. 3.)
16:420:510:S1:04365
HYBRID; 8/2 - 8/15; M-F, 1:30 PM-5:45 PM; AB-2200
ON-CAMPUS DATES: 8/2, 8/3, 8/7, 8/8, 8/10, 8/13
ONLINE DATES: 8/6, 8/9, 8/14, 8/15
ANNE-CATHERINE AUBERT

Fiction and consumption as we experience them today are two “products” dating back to the Industrial Revolution and are, in many ways, closely related to one another. From the 19th century on fiction has been turned into a commodity as an increasing number of authors have relied on the copyright to make a living. In a parallel fashion, consumption has been fictionalized, becoming a major theme of the French novel. In this course students will explore some of the unprecedented historical, cultural, and social developments of both fiction and consumption during the past 150 years, through various literary texts and their cinematic adaptations. Special attention will also be paid to the phenomenon of advertising as it has, after all, invaded our modern fictional world. Readings include novels by Zola, Perec, Beigbeder, a sample of discursive and visual ads, and some theoretical writings. Online sessions will include Internet research and regular pedagogical hands-on activities that will lead to the design of a full-fledged module to be used in K-12 classes. Conducted in French.


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